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We know the limitations of avoiding big conversations and feelings in relationship on a regular basis, so avoidance is obviously not recommended as a long term strategy. But it can be used in moments, in small doses, as in the story above, to preserve a more important, agreed upon value.

Some people who have been enduring the Drama of the Gifted Relationship have simply tired of it. They want their relationships to be based on and about something other than processing feelings. Something like pleasure, or creativity, or both.

I usually go for seltzer water or fermented grapes, but sometimes you get the kind of news that is better swallowed with real spirits.

Although it was a special Valentine's Day dinner, in a very pricey restaurant, we could hear the conversation of the couple next to us all too well. They weren't loud: We were quiet. Silent, in fact.

With all the choices and information about relationships we now have available to us, I am still surprised by how many people jump into serious partnerships -- business, close friendships and yes, marriages -- without laying any groundwork to see if the other is on the same page about the future. Final post in the Leadership in Relationship series.

When you clarify your roles in relationship and bring consciousness to the leadership in them, something sacred happens. All the energy dedicated to jockeying for power and position gets contained in conscious roles, and frees you up to really focus on loving and on things you love to do together.

In the fourth post in the Leadership in Relationship Series, Amber and her boyfriend use leadership principles to co-create a partnership that diminishes drama, minimizes the tendency to get emotionally wound up and take everything personally, and increase the flow of communication, connection and closeness.

The heart itself is not always a trustworthy leader. It simply is. It likes what it likes. It loves things that are good for it, it loves things that are bad for it. It’s up to us to discriminate, to steer the ship that rides on heart's waves. The second article in the Leadership in Relationship series.

Even if you’re in a good relationship, a great relationship, it can be pretty easy to lose touch with your partner. When you lose touch with your primary partner, you can lose full access to your heart, your vitality and your natural good cheer, or, as they like to say, holiday spirit.